More
29.09.12

Watts Happened

Price being the main hurdle, it has taken me years to commit to buying a power meter and like so many riders before me, I wish I'd done it earlier. Since the beginning of this year I've been training and racing with a power meter.

If you are ever looking to buy a pair of race wheels, buy a power meter instead. Instead of a new bike, buy a power meter. In fact, I would go so far as to say, if you are considering a Time Trial bike/frame buy a power meter for your road bike and convert it with clip on aero bars.

That is if you want to be a better cyclist.

A power meter will improve your riding more than a new bike could. You will go faster on your current bike with a power meter than you ever will on the latest Pinarello. A power meter won't necessarily make you look good but it will make you look smart.

A power meter isn't magic, you still have to do the training. But, training with power is like being on the inside, being more grown up, there is a certain 'Ahhhhhhhhh...I get it now' and that is a great feeling to have.

There's some essential reading to get to grips with to ensure you understand what you are doing and to help you improve.

Cutting-Edge Cycling
Training and Racing with a Power Meter
The Power Meter Handbook

Reading the books and completing some of the simple tests will give you an understanding of the rider you are (strengths and weaknesses), how to become the rider you want to be, whether that's a climber, sprinter, time trialist, etc. and they provide plenty of training sessions to improve specific areas of your fitness.

In less than a season I am already a better cyclist and triathlete. Over the coming months I'll write more about training and racing with watts to convince you it's the best investment you can make.

To whet your appetite though, how about...

- Why training with power is better than training with heart rate.
- Why power beats RPE (Rate of Perceived Exertion) as a scale.
- How a power meter helped me know that I HAD returned to fitness.
- Beating the weather using power.
- Using power in a triathlon.
- Testing with power.
- Better pacing, climbing.
- Better coaching.

04.09.12

Gardner achieves Iron vision

Last month, James Gardner from Danville, San Francisco (California) conquered the 140.6 mile Coeur d'Alene course in 12 hours to become a first-time Ironman.

Like many age-group triathletes James had never followed a structured training plan before but knew he needed to if he was to juggle family time, career, business air-travel and a house move, if he was to make the successful leap from short course and half-iron distance racing to a full Ironman.

James with family in San Francisco
James with family in San Francisco

"As a family-man time is precious and I just needed someone to take care of the planning and make the necessary adjustments to my training should something come up", said the 39 years-old marketing vice president. "Toby kept my training consistent, which meant some creative sessions given the limited facilities in some hotels. Communication was key, I told him in advance when issues arose and he tweaked my plan to keep me training."

Training consistently is key to a achieving success no matter what the distance. If you don't train consistently then a coach can't plan appropriate progressions and you won't continue to make the necessary adaptations to increasing training stimulus.

If you're trying to juggle family, a busy working life and your training, cheap off-the-shelf training plans don't work. A coach is there to revise your plan when your circumstances change.

James with his marketing team
James with his marketing team

"Long distance training can be quite a challenge. It's good to know someone's got your back, has managed training and a stressful job himself and is there every step of the way with you. I'd often just pick up the phone and chat just to make sure I was on the right track. You can't expect your family and friends to understand what you go through if they've never followed a proper training plan before."

Achieving that Iron dream is a team effort and like all successful teams, two-way communication plays a key role: 1-2-1 training and meetings are not always possible, but email, Skype, videos of training/racing, data uploads and qualitative feedback all go towards tailoring a plan that works for each athlete.

Back to top